The Argentini (the Chimichurri Martini)

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Chimichurri is an Argentine sauce made from parsley, garlic, olive oil, oregano and vinegar. You can make an unusual aperitif by muddling a teaspoon into your vermouth before you pour a classic martini, to whet your appetite before a meal – especially if it’s a Latin American dish; a juicy steak for example. It will work particularly well if the dish you are serving for dinner has been marinaded in the Chimichurri as well.

I prefer variations of Chimichurri from other parts of Latin America that use a lot of coriander (cilantro) but the Argentine version is probably the one with the greatest appeal. My favourite Latin American sauce is green Colombian Ají, which would work very well for martini lovers who also have a penchant for hot spiciness and coriander flavour.

However, coriander/cilantro is the Marmite of the herb world: you either love it or hate it. For example, I love it; my mum hates it. I find it a fresh, clean, grassy flavour but people often complain that it tastes soapy or like washing up liquid. There doesn’t seem to be any middle ground.

If you’re not a fan, stick to the Argentine version of the sauce. Otherwise try this out with Colombian Ají – and preferably home made rather than the bottle I’ve used here.

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To prepare, muddle one teaspoon of Chimichurri sauce in a measure of vermouth (to taste, depending on how sweet or dry you like a martini). Top up with gin or vodka, then serve.

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It turns a milky-white colour like Pernod or Ouzo.

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As an accompanying meal I slathered more of the Chimichurri over some rainbow trout fillets and left them to marinate for half an hour while I poured – and drank – the drink.

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I then rolled them up, held them together with bamboo skewers and grilled them for around 15 minutes.

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I served it with salad and a yoghurt/Chimichurri sauce, drizzled with oil, a little balsamic vinegar and some dried oregano. It probably isn’t the most appetising meal you’ve ever seen, but that’s why I’m a martini-maker not a chef.

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