The Lemon Drop Martini with Foam

IMG_8950.JPG
This is a slight variation on a classic American cocktail. I first encountered the Lemon Drop in New York. A barman asked me what I wanted and I said I felt like something strong and astringent. It’s a very simple combination of sweet and sour, and it’s easy to make at home. Leave out the egg white and the frothing process in this recipe if you want an even simpler drink. For two martinis you will need:

* The juice of 1 lemon
* The white of 1 egg
* Sugar
* Sweet Vermouth
* Gin or vodka (it’s more conventional to use vodka)
* Chilled martini glasses

– Pour the lemon juice and 2 measures of vermouth into a large cup
– Add 2 teaspoons of sugar and stir until dissolved
– Pour the mixture into a bowl and add the egg white
– Beat well until the mixture is thoroughly blended and a thick, velvety foam has formed on top of the liquid
– Rim the martini glasses with sugar
– Using a spoon or fork to hold back the foam, pour the liquid into the martini glasses, about half way up.
– Fill up the rest of the glasses with gin or vodka, leaving a space of around 3-5mm. Lightly stir the mixture.
– Pour over the foam until it has covered the top of the drink and reached the rim of the glass
– If you like, you can sprinkle some grated lemon rind over the top of the foam to add even more zest, although I preferred it without

IMG_8949.JPG
The drink is sweet and sour with contrasting textures of sharp zesty alcohol, rich foam and the crunch of the sugar rim.

IMG_8948.JPG

Advertisements

The Churchill Martini

This is a crowd pleaser.
  

Winston Churchill was one of the world’s greatest war-time political leaders. He was also a martini drinker. We can thank both him and the classic drink for leading the fight against fascism.

IMG_8167.JPG
“I have taken more out of alcohol than alcohol has taken out of me”

What should be noted is that Churchill liked his martinis to be somewhat dry, as the following recipe will indicate:

  • Fill the martini glass with gin
  • Glare at an unopened bottle of vermouth
  • Add an olive

If you are without a bottle of vermouth you could substitute it by bowing in the direction of Italy, or perhaps more deferentially in the direction of any current troop deployments around the world.

  
Cigars are an optional extra.

You can also add more than one olive but this will depend on your rations.

IMG_8186.JPG
Don’t drink more than two.

The Lemon and Lime Drop Martini

Have you ever had a lemon drop martini? It’s the inspiration for this drink. I just altered the recipe slightly.

IMG_8026.JPG

You will need:

Gin or vodka (vodka is probably better)
Sweet vermouth
Lemons and limes (one each for the number of drinks you want to make)
Honey
Sprite (yes, sprite)

IMG_8015.JPG
I’m on holiday in the Mediterranean; a time for relaxation and spending quality time with friends.

A very important part of this holiday time is drink o’clock. Whatever you’ve spent your day doing, be it history, culture, hiking, watersports or simply lying by the pool, I crave the ceremonial time at sunset when everyone showers off the sea salt, chlorine or sweat and puts on their evening wear, in preparation for a drink followed by dinner. It’s my favourite part of the day.

My friend wanted to try an alternative to a martini so I started wracking my brain. She likes lemons and limes so I thought back to time spent in New York, a time when I first encountered the Lemon Drop Martini. This is basically a strong vodka drink with the addition of lemon juice and sugar.

I didn’t have all the ingredients available to make a classic lemon drop martini so I started to think something up. I could have trekked around the local shops for the right stuff but I’m on holiday! I also wanted to put to use the lovely limes we had to hand.

We didn’t have any sugar, which is an important lemon drop ingredient, but we did have some Greek honey, so I came up with a plan which I hoped had some real local spin to it.

IMG_8024.JPG
Low hanging fruit

Juice a lemon and a lime for every martini you want to make.

IMG_8020.JPG
For every drink add 2.5 teaspoons of honey to a cup, then add the same amount of hot water to melt it.

Stir the honey mixture until the honey has dissolved, then add the lemon and lime juice. Stir them and chill, either in the fridge for a few hours or the freezer if you’re pushed for time.

When drink o’clock happens, add a dash of sweet vermouth to a chilled martini glass.

Top up half way with the honey lime and lemon juice.

Add a measure or two of gin/vodka.

IMG_8018.JPG
Top up with sprite to add some effervescence.

Garnish with lemon and/or lime peel, then serve it before it warms up.

IMG_8025.JPG
Yiamas!

The Candyflosstini

IMG_7920.PNG
Referred to in the US as the Cotton Candy martini, this concoction could also be dubbed the Diabetini. It can be very sweet and isn’t my sort of drink, but I thought I would experiment with it nonetheless.

IMG_7839.JPG
Get yourself some candyfloss.

IMG_7843.JPG
Mix together some chilled vodka, cranberry juice and freshly squeezed lemon juice. A full lemon will yield enough for two of these martinis, while I made the vodka to cranberry ratio around 2:3 (although you can adjust this to taste).

IMG_7841.JPG
Line the rim of the glass with candyfloss, but be careful not to have it lying too deep into the glass. If it gets wet it will start to dissolve and could pull the whole garnish into the drink.

IMG_7844.JPG
Place some more candyfloss into the glass.

Pour the vodka cranberry over the candyfloss in the glass and watch it dissolve.

Remember to brush your teeth thoroughly and visit your dentist on a regular basis.