Mums Limoncello from the Last Milennium

We were clearing up the house after taking down all the Christmas decorations and we came across this mysterious bottle.


Okay okay… I say “mysterious” but actually, as soon as I saw it I knew exactly what it was.

Sometime in the last few years mum made some limoncello with vodka and lemon rind then left it to season. Obviously we forgot about it and it even managed to accompany us undetected through a house-move. I’m not quite sure how this happened but there you go.


So obviously I wanted to (a) taste it and (b) use it in martini form somehow.


A few years back a man in Beirut told me he liked to add a teaspoon or two of limoncello to his martinis to give them a nice, citrusy note.

So that’s what I did.


I chucked the limoncello into the freezer for a few hours, although note that some limoncellos might freeze. Mum’s was suitably alcoholic that it did not.


Add one teaspoon to a normal martini (the standard recipe is here) and stir it with your piece of lemon peel. Serve.


It adds a nice lemon aftertaste but is a little sweet, so consider using less vermouth than normal if you want to try this out.


It’s also worth noting that this makes an excellent substitute if you find yourself without any fresh lemons. Remember – these are crucial for making a standard martini (unless you’re having it dirty or you’ve got a very good or distinctive gin to taste). A teaspoon of limoncello might be a nicer to impart a lemon flavour than using a dab of lemon oil which I sometimes resort to.


The limoncello also goes very nicely added to a gin and tonic (with a 50:50 gin:limoncello ratio).


So act now: buy some limoncello, make your own, or give your house a spring clean. You never know what alcoholic delights might be gathering dust in a corner.


If you’re moving house be especially sure to check for rogue bottles. You wouldn’t want the next occupants to enjoy it at your expense.

Mum and Dad’s house gets 5/5 for martinis

I thought I would review my parents’ house to illustrate that you don’t need to be in a fancy bar to have a nice martini. I gave their venue full points for adhering to all the main points in the martini rating scale.

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They keep the gin and martini glasses in the freezer and they use lemon peel to flavour and garnish the drink.

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They serve good quality nibbles as an accompaniment.

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While the service is usually friendly and professional the setting and atmosphere are almost always lovely (even when the central heating breaks down). We’re either drinking in front of the fireside in winter, in the conservatory enjoying the setting sun in summer, or in the kitchen overlooking the view, perhaps with additional relatives paying a visit.

If you follow the how to make a martini guide there is no reason why you can’t get full marks at home either.