More snacks and nibbles to accompany martinis

Here is another selection of savoury snacks I’ve recently served and eaten with martinis.

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Roasted and salted soy beans.

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Prawns on lettuce with Peking duck sauce and fried spicy broad beans.

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You can get a lot of good stuff in IKEA.

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Fish roe goes well in Swedish croustades.

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Here are some of the filled croustades, as well as some Japanese nuts and seaweed snacks.

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Here are some more croustades with a smidgen of Sås senap and dill (a type of sweet Swedish mustard) topped up with Tångkorn (a salty seaweed extract) with a fleck of lemon peel to garnish.

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I like to keep a selection of things like peanuts, pistachio nuts, Bombay mix etc just in case you need an emergency martini (it happens).

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A simple favourite: Bombay mix and olives stuffed with anchovies.

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MUM’S ROAST BEEF!

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Sushi.

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Sage leaves fried in butter with garlic and walnuts (see here for the recipe).

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Steak. After you cook it, let it rest for about 5 minutes then slice it thinly.

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Scrumptious pieces of grilled Parma ham.

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Olives and squid.

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Elk and pork sausage.


Fried salmon skin.

Fried sage leaves again, but this time with no additions of garlic or nuts.

Ceviche.

Pistachio nuts.

 And finally, happiness is finding an olive (or three) at the bottom of your martini when you’re hungry, said a very wise man.

Swedish akvavit

It’s Christmas time and last night I decided to have a non-martini drink. I’ve previously mentioned my liking for akvavit for midsommar, but I also like it during the winter (to keep warm).
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I put some miniature bottles of akvavit (from Ikea) in the freezer for a day, then served them in heavy glasses and a single spherical ice cube. I like all the different infusions, as it adds a bit of variety to my normal gin diet.

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Skål och god jul!

Swedish accompaniments for a martini

Sweden produces some absolutely delightful snacks to accompany a martini. I love pickled things and seafood so it’s an absolute delight for me. Fish roe, gherkins and a range of condiments with subtle, natural flavours make a tasty accompaniment to a martini.

As an accompaniment for this entry I served Japanese peanut/rice snacks (obviously not Swedish, but it’s what I was craving) and two different types of fish roe, served in mini croustades.

I also stuck to a classic gin martini but if you prefer vodka then surely a Swedish brand would complete the theme. I’m also a fan of akvavit but I’m no expert. Perhaps there is such a thing as an akvavit martini but I don’t know. I’ll let you know if I hear of one. I also served this martini with an olive garnish but who knows, you could use dill if you wanted to make it look even more Scandinavian (or Russian for that matter – no-one loves dill more than the Russians do).

Miniature meatballs and some kind of dipping sauce also work well.

Skål!

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