The Beet Up Gibson Martini

This is a very simple variation on the classic Gibson martini


I always found Gibsons to be very visually striking. They are garnished with a small pickled onion or two, and perhaps a teaspoon of the pickle vinegar, instead of the classic olive or lemon twist.


They are bold and simple, with a slightly astringent taste from the vinegar.

The Beet Up Gibson uses pickled baby beetroot instead of pickled onion and is quite striking due to its colour.


Take two small pickled baby beetroot and two teaspoons of the pickle brine (or up to 6 of you really like the vinegar flavour).


Pour a standard martini (you can omit the lemon if you’re pushed for time/very thirsty).


Pour the pickle juice into the glass.


Give it a stir or it will look like a murder scene.


Thread the pickled beetroot onto a skewer or cocktail stick.

Place the beetroot into the glass and serve immediately.


I would also recommend serving a small side dish to place the pickled beetroot when drinking so the garnish doesn’t stain anything.


As an accompanying snack, I am a fan of things that are cured and pickled so I made a salmon ceviche using a Laura Santtini recipe but with an additional tablespoon of beetroot pickle to impart a red colour.


Note that I like to serve the ceviche marinade (leche de tigre) in a shot glass. Not only is it traditional Peruvian practise, it’s also tasty and, if I’m not much mistaken, very healthy (all that vitamin C from the citrus juice!).


The added beetroot makes it all the more striking.


Enjoy!

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Martini Porn for World Gin Day

Happy World Gin Day everyone. To whet your appetites I’ve put together a selection of some martini images from the last few months. If you fancy making your own tonight, here is my guide.

Enjoy!

 
Lemon Drop Martini during a London Spring sunset. 

  

  
A classic martini, the most elegant of drinks.

 

Channeling Danish hygge at my aunty’s house.

  
A selection of classics with plenty of nibbles.

  
A classic with many olives. 

  
A lychee martini.

  
Classic martinis.

  

“No lace. No lace, Mrs. Bennet, I beg you!” – a classic Pride and Prejudice quote that had to go with this martini and doily at home.

  
As you may have noticed, martinis go well with candlelight.

  
A classic with Japanese peanut snacks.

  
A Gibson martini.

  
More candlelight, this time with a hot and dirty martini, complete with ice still attached to the glass from the freezer.


And finally, an optimistic classic on a London summer evening.

Have a good weekend and enjoy World Gin Day responsibly!

Non-alcoholic rose and lemon drop martini

Yes, yes, non-alcoholic. I can’t drink all the time you know.

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After serving martinis, you might, as I do, find your fridge to be full of bald lemons, shaved of their peel but still bursting with juice. You can use them for all sorts of things, like cooking, putting them in hot water to drink in the morning, making ice cubes, or, as I have done today, juicing them and adding them to a cordial drink to make a refreshing, sweet and sour non-alcoholic beverage.

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Rooh Afza is a sweet, rose-flavoured syrupy cordial to dilute with water and drink, preferably on a hot day. It comes from Pakistan, a country I have never visited but where some of my family used to live (before partition in the old days of the British Raj).

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To counteract it’s strong sweetness I added the juice of a lemon to 35ml and a dash of balsamic vinegar. Stir well then place in the freezer for around 45 minutes. Pour into a chilled martini glass and top up with chilled tonic water. Garnish with a piece of lemon peel.

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You can also leave it in the freezer a little bit longer in individual shot glasses to make a miniature sorbet.

There you go, a non-alcoholic post on my otherwise gin-soaked blog. Pakistan Zindabad!

The Candyflosstini

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Referred to in the US as the Cotton Candy martini, this concoction could also be dubbed the Diabetini. It can be very sweet and isn’t my sort of drink, but I thought I would experiment with it nonetheless.

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Get yourself some candyfloss.

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Mix together some chilled vodka, cranberry juice and freshly squeezed lemon juice. A full lemon will yield enough for two of these martinis, while I made the vodka to cranberry ratio around 2:3 (although you can adjust this to taste).

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Line the rim of the glass with candyfloss, but be careful not to have it lying too deep into the glass. If it gets wet it will start to dissolve and could pull the whole garnish into the drink.

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Place some more candyfloss into the glass.

Pour the vodka cranberry over the candyfloss in the glass and watch it dissolve.

Remember to brush your teeth thoroughly and visit your dentist on a regular basis.