A martini with sage

This is a very simple recipe for a snack that may or may not taste like fragrant Pringles made for the Gods…

 

While coriander is my favourite herb (controversial, I know), I also love sage.

I previously made a sage-infused gin which goes nicely in a gin and tonic. 

  

However, this sage recipe is very easy and infinitely faster than making an infusion.

  

Instructions

  • Pick around 8 sage leaves per person (or more if they’re small or if you want to eat a lot).
  • Fry them (potentially in batches) in salted butter on a high heat for about 2-3 minutes.
  • The butter should be foaming but be careful not to burn it (remove it from the heat if this starts to happen).
  • The leaves are ready when they’re crispy with tinges of brown colouring.
  • Serve immediately and eat with your fingers (although you can use a fork or chopsticks if you prefer).
  • Save the leftover butter to pour over food (like potatoes), perhaps if you have a meal after your martini and snack.

  
And there you go. It’s like eating fragrant, salty, crunchy air that slides over your tongue. It’s particularly satisfying if you’ve grown the herbs yourself.

  
And obviously these delicious, simple but slightly unusual snacks go very well with a martini…

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The Parmesan Cheese Martini

“Sweet dreams are made of cheese.” 

Before you think “that sounds gross” I would recommend giving this one a try.

This martini idea genuinely came to me in a dream. I woke up with a clear memory of shaking up a cheese martini and decided to google whether or not such a thing existed. It turns out that at least two recipes are out there in the interwebs, such as the Grilled Cheese Martini, so I decided to have a go at my own variation. 

I used a tablespoon of Parmesan cheese for every 100ml of vodka I wanted to infuse (when it comes to flavour – go big or go home).  

 

Put it all in a clean jar and give it a good shake, then leave it in a cool, dark place (i.e. not like in the above photo – but doesn’t London look good?). 

Continue to shake it every now and then, just when you remember – maybe one a day or so, maybe more if you’re enthusiastic and impatient for CHEESE FLAVOUR. Do this over the course of around four days. 

Get yourself some plain cheesecloth. Strain the vodka infusion through it so as to remove much of the cheese goo.

Pour the strained liquid into a jar and place in the freezer for at least 6 hours.

Then, when it’s time to serve, add some vermouth to a martini glass and top up with the infused vodka, as per these instructions and measurements, i.e. 2tsp – 30ml vermouth (to taste) and around 130ml vodka).

Before you pour the drink, the www.parmesan.com blog suggests rubbing a little honey around the rim of the glass and dusting it with Parmesan powder. This sounds delicious but in this instance I really wanted to taste the Parmesan in the alcohol itself to test how effective the infusion process had been, so I left the glass un-rimmed.

Next, stir the drink and garnish it. You could choose all sorts of things for this: 

Grapes for example;

A simple pickle perhaps;

Or some prosciutto.

Olives stuffed with cheese would be a good alternative. Asparagus spears, perhaps trimmed so that they fit into the glass without towering over it, would also work. A basil leaf or two, or maybe some cherry tomatoes, would also compliment the Parmesan flavour.

 

And as for accompanying nibbles you could serve it with all of the above garnishes. Figs, walnuts, fried sage leaves and of course, cheese and biscuits, will all work well.

If you still think it sounds like a weird concoction I promise you it’s a nice, savoury/umami flavour that REALLY whet my appetite before my meal. If you make some of these for guests at a dinner party it will no doubt be a talking point.

More snacks and nibbles to accompany martinis

Here is another selection of savoury snacks I’ve recently served and eaten with martinis.

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Roasted and salted soy beans.

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Prawns on lettuce with Peking duck sauce and fried spicy broad beans.

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You can get a lot of good stuff in IKEA.

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Fish roe goes well in Swedish croustades.

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Here are some of the filled croustades, as well as some Japanese nuts and seaweed snacks.

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Here are some more croustades with a smidgen of Sås senap and dill (a type of sweet Swedish mustard) topped up with Tångkorn (a salty seaweed extract) with a fleck of lemon peel to garnish.

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I like to keep a selection of things like peanuts, pistachio nuts, Bombay mix etc just in case you need an emergency martini (it happens).

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A simple favourite: Bombay mix and olives stuffed with anchovies.

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MUM’S ROAST BEEF!

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Sushi.

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Sage leaves fried in butter with garlic and walnuts (see here for the recipe).

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Steak. After you cook it, let it rest for about 5 minutes then slice it thinly.

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Scrumptious pieces of grilled Parma ham.

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Olives and squid.

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Elk and pork sausage.


Fried salmon skin.

Fried sage leaves again, but this time with no additions of garlic or nuts.

Ceviche.

Pistachio nuts.

 And finally, happiness is finding an olive (or three) at the bottom of your martini when you’re hungry, said a very wise man.

How to make sage-infused gin (for martinis or gin and tonics)

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I have sage growing in the garden so I thought I would make good use of it. When infused in gin it adds a subtle dimension to a martini. It also goes very well in a gin and tonic.

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Pick a generous bunch of sage leaves, approximately 15 per 100ml of gin you intend to infuse.

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Wash, pat dry, then roughly chop the leaves.

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Add them to a jar and top up with gin. I used around 300ml. Give it a rigorous shake and leave it to brew for two days, shaking it once or twice more over the course of the period.

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When it’s time to pour, make a classic martini but replace the standard gin with your infused sage gin. Feel free to garnish with a fresh sage leaf.

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As an accompanying amuse-bouche try turning the heat up on a frying pan and add some olive oil. When it’s hot stir in some minced garlic, chopped walnuts and more fresh sage leaves. Stir fry for about a minute or two until the leaves are crunchy. Serve immediately.